Support Groups
Homeschoolers have created networks of support to provide a way to make friends, get ideas and information, and to offer positive socialization opportunties to their children. You can join in! There are many groups to choose from, many with specific affiliations, like Christian groups or unschoolers' groups. Some are eclectic, inclusive, and open to anyone. Whatever your interest, you are sure to find other like-minded parents. And if you don't find what you are looking for, we've put together tips for starting your own group.
Local & State Groups
Support groups offer a way for those interested in homeschooling or new to home education to get information and support. They also offer opportunities for social activities, group learning, and networking. Find a support group near you in D.C..
National Groups
Tap into the national homeschool movement by connecting with these national homeschool groups and support organizations.
Social Media
Connect with other homeschooling using social networking tools. You can share tips and ideas, get support, collaborate on lesson plans, upload photos, and much more.
Co-Ops
A co-op offers a way to share teaching duties with others who are excited and knowledgeable about a subject. It also offers an opportunity for your children to learn in a group and to make friends. Browse through this list of co-ops in D.C..
Umbrella/Cover Schools
An umbrella or cover school provides an alternative way for parents to fulfill governmental educational guidelines and requirements. Most offer a variety of services, which can include curricula, social activities, field trips, standardized testing, portfolio reviews, evaluations, and graduation materials, including diplomas. While umbrella schools do tend to the needs of homeschoolers, they are considered a type of private school in most states.
Resource Centers
Homeschool resource centers offer classes, materials, field trips, and other activities for parents and children alike. They are great ways to get new information, engage in group activities, and network with other homeschoolers.
Public School Programs
Public schools are increasing offering programs to appeal to homeschooling families, from classes to educational materials to computer and distance learning. In most cases, students enrolled in these programs are considered public school students rather than homeschoolers. Learn more about these programs and decide if these are right for your family.
Group Management
Learn how to start and manage a homeschool support group, including how to stay organized, how to handle conflict, and ideas for your support group.
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